J Plant Ecol ›› 2015, Vol. 8 ›› Issue (1): 51-60.DOI: 10.1093/jpe/rtu006

• Research Articles • Previous Articles     Next Articles

Soil respiration associated with plant succession at the meadow steppes in Songnen Plain, Northeast China

Ming Wang1,2, Xingtu Liu1, Jitao Zhang1, Xiujun Li1,*, Guodong Wang1,2, Xiaoyu Li1 and Weiwei Chen1   

  1. 1 Key Laboratory of Wetland Ecology and Environment, Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, Jilin 130102, China; 2 University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
  • Received:2014-03-13 Accepted:2014-05-14 Published:2015-01-22
  • Contact: Li, Xiujun

Abstract: Aims Soil CO2 emission from steppes is affected by soil properties and vegetation in different successional stages. Primary and secondary succession of plants frequently occurred at the meadow steppe in Songnen Plain, Northeast China, which indicates the large uncertainty associated with CO2 emission in this environment. This study aims to investigate the temporal variations of soil respiration (Rs) and the effect of plant succession on cumulative soil CO2 emission during the growing season.
Methods Using a LI-6400 soil CO2 flux system, Rs of five vegetation types which represented different stages of plant succession in meadow steppes of Songnen Plain, China, was investigated during the growing seasons of 2011 and 2012.
Important findings Soil temperature (Ts) was the dominant controlling factor of Rs, which could explain ~64% of the change in CO2 fluxes. The Q 10 values of Rs were ranged from 2.0 to 6.7, showing a decreasing trend with the plant successional stages. The cumulative CO2 emission increased with the degree of vegetation succession and it averaged to 316±6g C m ?2 (ranges: 74.8±6.7 to 516.5±11.4g C m ?2) during the growing season. The magnitude of soil CO2 emission during the growing season was positively correlated with aboveground plant biomass, soil organic carbon content and mean soil water content, while negatively linked to mean Ts, pH, electrical conductivity and exchangeable sodium percentages. The results implied that soil CO2 emission increased with the development of plant communities toward more advanced stages. Our findings provided valuable information for understanding the variations of CO2 emission in the process of vegetation succession.

Key words: soil respiration, CO2, plant succession, cumulative CO2 emission, meadow steppe

摘要:
Aims Soil CO2 emission from steppes is affected by soil properties and vegetation in different successional stages. Primary and secondary succession of plants frequently occurred at the meadow steppe in Songnen Plain, Northeast China, which indicates the large uncertainty associated with CO2 emission in this environment. This study aims to investigate the temporal variations of soil respiration (Rs) and the effect of plant succession on cumulative soil CO2 emission during the growing season.
Methods Using a LI-6400 soil CO2 flux system, Rs of five vegetation types which represented different stages of plant succession in meadow steppes of Songnen Plain, China, was investigated during the growing seasons of 2011 and 2012.
Important findings Soil temperature (Ts) was the dominant controlling factor of Rs, which could explain ~64% of the change in CO2 fluxes. The Q 10 values of Rs were ranged from 2.0 to 6.7, showing a decreasing trend with the plant successional stages. The cumulative CO2 emission increased with the degree of vegetation succession and it averaged to 316±6g C m ?2 (ranges: 74.8±6.7 to 516.5±11.4g C m ?2) during the growing season. The magnitude of soil CO2 emission during the growing season was positively correlated with aboveground plant biomass, soil organic carbon content and mean soil water content, while negatively linked to mean Ts, pH, electrical conductivity and exchangeable sodium percentages. The results implied that soil CO2 emission increased with the development of plant communities toward more advanced stages. Our findings provided valuable information for understanding the variations of CO2 emission in the process of vegetation succession.