J Plant Ecol ›› 2016, Vol. 9 ›› Issue (1): 61-68.doi: 10.1093/jpe/rtv045

• Research Articles • Previous Articles     Next Articles

UV-B has larger negative impacts on invasive populations of Triadica sebifera but ozone impacts do not vary

Hong Wang1,2, Xiaochi Ma1, Ling Zhang3, Evan Siemann1,2 and Jianwen Zou1,*   

  1. 1 College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095, China; 2 Department of Biosciences, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005, USA; 3 College of Forestry, Jiangxi Agricultural University, Nanchang 330045, China
  • Received:2015-02-01 Accepted:2015-05-15 Online:2015-05-29 Published:2016-01-27
  • Contact: Siemann, Evan E-mail:jwzou21@njau.edu.cn

Abstract: Aims Abiotic stresses may interact with each other to determine impacts on plants so that their combined impact is less than or more than additive. Increasing UV-B radiation and surface ozone (O 3) are two major components of global change that may have such interactive impacts. Moreover, invasive and native populations of plants may respond differently to stresses as they can vary in primary and secondary metabolism.
Methods Here, we conducted a factorial field experiment with open-top chambers assigned to an ozone treatment (ambient, 100 ppb, or 150 ppb) and UV-B treatment (ambient or increased 20%). We grew seedlings of native and invasive populations of Triadica sebifera in these chambers for one growing season.
Important findings Invasive plants grew faster than native plants in ambient UV-B but they did not differ significantly in elevated UV-B. Litter production of invasive plants was especially sensitive to UV-B in a way that increased with UV-B for native plants but decreased for invasive plants which may be important for nutrient cycling. In ambient UV-B, total mass decreased as ozone increased. Total mass was lower with elevated UV-B but there was no additional impact of increasing ozone. Leaf area did not decrease with UV-B so SLA and LAR were lowest at ambient ozone levels. These results suggest that the effects of ozone will depend on UV-B conditions perhaps due to changes in foliar traits. The traits that allow invasive populations of plants to be successful invaders may make them especially sensitive to UV-B which may reduce their success in future climatic conditions.

Key words: invasive, UV-B, O3, cross-tolerance, litter

摘要:
Aims Abiotic stresses may interact with each other to determine impacts on plants so that their combined impact is less than or more than additive. Increasing UV-B radiation and surface ozone (O 3) are two major components of global change that may have such interactive impacts. Moreover, invasive and native populations of plants may respond differently to stresses as they can vary in primary and secondary metabolism.
Methods Here, we conducted a factorial field experiment with open-top chambers assigned to an ozone treatment (ambient, 100 ppb, or 150 ppb) and UV-B treatment (ambient or increased 20%). We grew seedlings of native and invasive populations of Triadica sebifera in these chambers for one growing season.
Important findings Invasive plants grew faster than native plants in ambient UV-B but they did not differ significantly in elevated UV-B. Litter production of invasive plants was especially sensitive to UV-B in a way that increased with UV-B for native plants but decreased for invasive plants which may be important for nutrient cycling. In ambient UV-B, total mass decreased as ozone increased. Total mass was lower with elevated UV-B but there was no additional impact of increasing ozone. Leaf area did not decrease with UV-B so SLA and LAR were lowest at ambient ozone levels. These results suggest that the effects of ozone will depend on UV-B conditions perhaps due to changes in foliar traits. The traits that allow invasive populations of plants to be successful invaders may make them especially sensitive to UV-B which may reduce their success in future climatic conditions.

[1] Yan Zhang, Xun Li, Danju Zhang, Yu Qin, Yang Zhou, Simeng Song and Jian Zhang. Characteristics of fungal community structure during the decomposition of mixed foliage litter from Pinus massoniana and broadleaved tree species in southwestern China [J]. J Plant Ecol, 2020, 13(5): 574-588.
[2] Maurício Cruz Mantoani , Alberto Benavent González, Leopoldo García Sancho and Bruce Arthur Osborne. Growth, phenology and N-utilization by invasive populations of Gunnera tinctoria [J]. J Plant Ecol, 2020, 13(5): 589-600.
[3] Bingrui Jia, Hongru Sun, Wenying Yu and Guangsheng Zhou. Quantifying the interannual litterfall variations in China’s forest ecosystems [J]. J Plant Ecol, 2020, 13(3): 266-272.
[4] Alejandro Presotto, Fernando Hernández, Mauricio Casquero, Roman Vercellino, Claudio Pandolfo , Mónica Poverene and Miguel Cantamutto. Seed bank dynamics of an invasive alien species, Helianthus annuus L. [J]. J Plant Ecol, 2020, 13(3): 313-322.
[5] Singkone Xayalath, Isao Hirota, Shinsuke Tomita and Michiko Nakagawa. Aboveground biomass and seasonal patterns of aboveground net primary productivity in five bamboo species in northern Laos [J]. J Plant Ecol, 2020, 13(2): 150-156.
[6] Robert Frederick Bode and Catherine Dufresne. Natural selection on flower size in invasive Cytisus scoparius along an elevation gradient [J]. J Plant Ecol, 2020, 13(2): 165-170.
[7] Yamei Chen, Yang Liu, Jian Zhang, Wanqin Yang, Changchun Deng and Runlian He. Cumulative cellulolytic enzyme activities and initial litter quality in prediction of cellulose degradation in an alpine meadow of the eastern Tibetan Plateau [J]. J Plant Ecol, 2020, 13(1): 51-58.
[8] Jialiang Zhang, Evan Siemann, Baoliang Tian, Wei Huang and Jianqing Ding. Differences in seed properties and germination between native and introduced populations of Triadica sebifera [J]. J Plant Ecol, 2020, 13(1): 70-77.
[9] Huan-Huan Song, Tao Yan and De-Hui Zeng. Establishment of mixed plantations of Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica and Populus × xiaozhuanica may not be appropriate: evidence from litter decomposition [J]. J Plant Ecol, 2019, 12(5): 857-870.
[10] Seung Hyun Han, Seongjun Kim, Hanna Chang, Hyun-Jun Kim, Asia Khamzina and Yowhan Son. Soil depth- and root diameter-related variations affect root decomposition in temperate pine and oak forests [J]. J Plant Ecol, 2019, 12(5): 871-881.
[11] Yin Li, Helge Bruelheide, Thomas Scholten, Bernhard Schmid, Zhenkai Sun, Naili Zhang, Wensheng Bu, Xiaojuan Liu and Keping Ma. Early positive effects of tree species richness on soil organic carbon accumulation in a large-scale forest biodiversity experiment [J]. J Plant Ecol, 2019, 12(5): 882-893.
[12] Bi-Cheng Dong, Li-Min Zhang, Kai-Yu Li, Xiao-Ting Hu, Pu Wang, Yong-Jian Wang, Fang-Li Luo, Hong-Li Li and Fei-Hai Yu. Effects of clonal integration and nitrogen supply on responses of a clonal plant to short-term herbivory [J]. J Plant Ecol, 2019, 12(4): 624-635.
[13] Jing Wang, Qingsong Yang, Yang Qiao, Deli Zhai, Lifen Jiang, Guopeng Liang, Xiaoying Sun, Ning Wei, Xihua Wang and Jianyang Xia. Relative contributions of biotic and abiotic factors to the spatial variation of litter stock in a mature subtropical forest [J]. J Plant Ecol, 2019, 12(4): 769-780.
[14] Alexander Kofi Anning, Bridget Gyamfi and Angelina Tima Effah. Broussonetia papyrifera controls nutrient return to soil to facilitate its invasion in a tropical forest of Ghana [J]. J Plant Ecol, 2018, 11(6): 909-918.
[15] Vasile Alexandru Suchar, Ronald Robberecht. Integration and scaling of UV-B radiation effects on plants: the relative sensitivity of growth forms and interspecies interactions [J]. J Plant Ecol, 2018, 11(4): 656-670.
Viewed
Full text


Abstract

Cited

  Shared   
  Discussed   
No Suggested Reading articles found!