J Plant Ecol ›› 2009, Vol. 2 ›› Issue (3): 153-167.doi: 10.1093/jpe/rtp013

• Research Articles • Previous Articles    

The impact of Gunnera tinctoria (Molina) Mirbel invasions on soil seed bank communities

Margherita Gioria* and Bruce Osborne   

  1. UCD School of Biology and Environmental Science, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
  • Received:2009-05-19 Accepted:2009-07-17 Online:2009-08-07 Published:2009-08-26
  • Contact: Gioria, Margherita E-mail:margherita.gioria@ucd.ie

Abstract: Aims In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in the impact of invasive alien plant species on the soil seed bank. Soil seed banks play an important role in determining the composition and dynamics of the vegetation through time. Therefore, an ability to form a persistent seed bank and/or a capacity to alter the structure of the seed bank of invaded communities could be important factors in determining the success of many alien plant species. In this study, we report on a detailed assessment of the characteristics of the seed bank community associated with the herbaceous plant invader, Gunnera tinctoria, a newly emerging and potentially globally significant invasive plant species. This species, native to South America, is invasive in a range of wet habitats in Europe, Australasia and the USA.
Methods A comprehensive assessment of the seed bank of invaded and comparable uninvaded areas was made at two points in time (May and October), at three sites in western Ireland. The seedling emergence approach was used to assess the structure (diversity, dominance and abundance) of the soil seed bank. Differences between invaded and uninvaded seed bank communities were investigated at the spatial scales of site, plot and depth.
Important findings Gunnera tinctoria formed a large persistent seed bank at the study sites. Approximately 30-000 seedlings per square metre emerged from soils collected from invaded areas, of which 30% were found in deep soil layers. Seedlings of this invader represented 53–86% of the total number of seedlings associated with invaded areas. Both the transient and the more persistent component of the seed bank of invaded communities were significantly less diverse and abundant than those of uninvaded areas, and were characterized by higher dominance, even when seedlings of the invader were not included in the analysis. The seed bank of invaded areas was largely composed of seeds of agricultural weeds in addition to those of the invader. These results suggest that G. tinctoria has the capacity to profoundly alter the seed bank of invaded communities. These results have direct relevance for the development of control and management strategies, for this and other comparable invasive species, which should account for both quantitative and qualitative alterations in the seed bank community. Our study also suggests that control measures that result in disturbance of areas colonized by G. tinctoria could promote the germination of undesirable weeds.

Key words: invasive species, soil seed bank, diversity, dominance, Gunnera tinctoria

摘要:
Aims In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in the impact of invasive alien plant species on the soil seed bank. Soil seed banks play an important role in determining the composition and dynamics of the vegetation through time. Therefore, an ability to form a persistent seed bank and/or a capacity to alter the structure of the seed bank of invaded communities could be important factors in determining the success of many alien plant species. In this study, we report on a detailed assessment of the characteristics of the seed bank community associated with the herbaceous plant invader, Gunnera tinctoria, a newly emerging and potentially globally significant invasive plant species. This species, native to South America, is invasive in a range of wet habitats in Europe, Australasia and the USA.
Methods A comprehensive assessment of the seed bank of invaded and comparable uninvaded areas was made at two points in time (May and October), at three sites in western Ireland. The seedling emergence approach was used to assess the structure (diversity, dominance and abundance) of the soil seed bank. Differences between invaded and uninvaded seed bank communities were investigated at the spatial scales of site, plot and depth.
Important findings Gunnera tinctoria formed a large persistent seed bank at the study sites. Approximately 30-000 seedlings per square metre emerged from soils collected from invaded areas, of which 30% were found in deep soil layers. Seedlings of this invader represented 53–86% of the total number of seedlings associated with invaded areas. Both the transient and the more persistent component of the seed bank of invaded communities were significantly less diverse and abundant than those of uninvaded areas, and were characterized by higher dominance, even when seedlings of the invader were not included in the analysis. The seed bank of invaded areas was largely composed of seeds of agricultural weeds in addition to those of the invader. These results suggest that G. tinctoria has the capacity to profoundly alter the seed bank of invaded communities. These results have direct relevance for the development of control and management strategies, for this and other comparable invasive species, which should account for both quantitative and qualitative alterations in the seed bank community. Our study also suggests that control measures that result in disturbance of areas colonized by G. tinctoria could promote the germination of undesirable weeds.

[1] Maurício Cruz Mantoani , Alberto Benavent González, Leopoldo García Sancho and Bruce Arthur Osborne. Growth, phenology and N-utilization by invasive populations of Gunnera tinctoria [J]. J Plant Ecol, 2020, 13(5): 589-600.
[2] Chris M. McGrannachan, Gillis J. Horner and Melodie A. McGeoch. Scale dependence in the phylogenetic relatedness of alien and native taxa [J]. J Plant Ecol, 2020, 13(5): 601-610.
[3] Jinliang Liu, Yuchen Zhong, Lei Zhong, Boliang Wei, Shilu Zheng, Yuchu Xie, Yi Jin and Mingjian Yu. The asymmetric relationships of the distribution of conspecific saplings and adults in forest fragments [J]. J Plant Ecol, 2020, 13(4): 398-404.
[4] Xin Jing, Case M. Prager, Aimée T. Classen, Fernando T. Maestre, Jin-Sheng He and Nathan J. Sanders. Variation in the methods leads to variation in the interpretation of biodiversity–ecosystem multifunctionality relationships [J]. J Plant Ecol, 2020, 13(4): 431-441.
[5] Peter Dietrich, Christiane Roscher, Adam Thomas Clark, Nico Eisenhauer, Bernhard Schmid and Cameron Wagg. Diverse plant mixtures sustain a greater arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi spore viability than monocultures after 12 years [J]. J Plant Ecol, 2020, 13(4): 478-488.
[6] Nannan Wang, Lei Li, Bingwei Zhang, Shiping Chen, Wei Sun, Yukun Luo, Kuanhu Dong, Xingguo Han, Jianhui Huang, Xiaofeng Xu and Changhui Wang. Population turnover promotes fungal stability in a semi-arid grassland under precipitation shifts [J]. J Plant Ecol, 2020, 13(4): 499-509.
[7] Yuting Lin, Achyut Kumar Banerjee, Haidan Wu, Fengxiao Tan, Hui Feng, Guangwen Tan, Wuxia Guo and Yelin Huang. Prominent genetic structure across native and introduced ranges of Pluchea indica, a mangrove associate, as revealed by microsatellite markers [J]. J Plant Ecol, 2020, 13(3): 341-353.
[8] Kelly Marianne Guimarães Pereira, Natielle Gomes Cordeiro, Marcela de Castro Nunes Santos Terra, Marcela Venelli Pyles, Christian Dias Cabacinha, José Márcio de Mello and Eduardo van den Berg. Protection status as determinant of carbon stock drivers in Cerrado sensu stricto [J]. J Plant Ecol, 2020, 13(3): 361-368.
[9] Di Wang, Yi-Ran Zhang, Yu-Long Feng, Zhi Liu and Bo Qu. Changes in vegetation and soil properties following 6 years of enclosure in riparian corridors [J]. J Plant Ecol, 2020, 13(2): 131-138.
[10] Juntao Zhu , Yangjian Zhang, Wenfeng Wang, Xian Yang , Ning Chen , Ruonan Shen , Li Wang and Lin Jiang. Species turnover drives grassland community to phylogenetic clustering over long-term grazing disturbance [J]. J Plant Ecol, 2020, 13(2): 157-164.
[11] Daniel M. Arruda, Luiz F. S. Magnago, Ricardo R. C. Solar, Reinaldo Duque-Brasil, Priscyla M. S. Rodrigues, Rubens M. Santos and Carlos E. G. R. Schaefer. Soil and climate equally contribute to changes in the species compositions of Brazilian dry forests across 300 km [J]. J Plant Ecol, 2020, 13(2): 171-176.
[12] Bobbymoore Konsam, Shyam S. Phartyal and Nagendra P. Todaria. Impact of forest fire on soil seed bank composition in Himalayan Chir pine forest [J]. J Plant Ecol, 2020, 13(2): 177-184.
[13] Věroslava Hadincová, Hana Skálová and Zuzana Münzbergová. Genotypic diversity and genotype identity of resident species drive community composition [J]. J Plant Ecol, 2020, 13(2): 224-232.
[14] Lu-Xi Chen, Su-Ting Xu, Wei-Hang Ding, Jun-Min Li and Peter Alpert. Genetic diversity and offspring fitness in the red and white fruit color morphs of the wild strawberry Fragaria pentaphylla [J]. J Plant Ecol, 2020, 13(1): 36-41.
[15] Gianalberto Losapio, and Christian Schöb. Pollination interactions reveal direct costs and indirect benefits of plant–plant facilitation for ecosystem engineers [J]. J Plant Ecol, 2020, 13(1): 107-113.
Viewed
Full text


Abstract

Cited

  Shared   
  Discussed   
No Suggested Reading articles found!